Credit Never Happened/Simulation

Faced with a performance gap the two most obvious responses are to work harder or work smarter. There are trade offs associated with each, some obvious, some not so obvious.Derived from Nobody Ever Gets Credit for Fixing Problems that Never Happened: Creating and Sustaining Process Improvement by Repenning and Sterman.An element of The Perspectives Project at Credit Never Happened at SystemsWiki.org

Faced with a performance gap the two most obvious responses are to work harder or work smarter. There are trade offs associated with each, some obvious, some not so obvious.

Derived from Nobody Ever Gets Credit for Fixing Problems that Never Happened: Creating and Sustaining Process Improvement by Repenning and Sterman.

An element of The Perspectives Project at Credit Never Happened at SystemsWiki.org

A number of enhancements have been made to the relations version of this model to turn it into a working simulation. Please read the description of the variables in the Configuration Panel on the right.
The baseline settings result in a stable operation as it should with a Base Performance of 39 resulting from Time Spent Working = 39 and Time Spent on Improvement = 1.
With a Desired Performance Change = 5 how the system responds depends on the choice of whether to work harder, smarter, or some of each.
With a choice of HardSmart = 0.1, which means 90% added effort on Time Spent Working and 10% effort on Time Spent on Improvement desired performance is quickly reached though can't be maintained because of Capability Erosion. Actual performance then begins to decline over time.
With a response of HardSmart = 0.9, which means 10% added effort on Time Spent Working and 90% effort on Time Spent on Improvement it takes a bit longer to achieve Desired Performance though the Time Spent in Investment rapidly provides payback. Desired Performance in time is achieved with less Time Spent Working thus reducing the Cost of Operation.
With a response of HardSmart = 0.5, which means 50% added effort on Time Spent Working and 50% effort on Time Spent on Improvement it takes a bit longer to achieve Desired Performance than in the previous example. The Time Spent Working achieves the desired performance and the the Time Spent on Improvement does provide a slight benefit over time, though not considered significant.
Change the parameters and click the Simulate button a number of times to get a better sense of the implications relationships of this model.

View the model in Insight Maker