Clone of The Boy Who Cried Wolf

This model depicts the interactions of Aesop's Fable "The Boy Who Cried Wolf."If you find these contributions meaningful your sponsorship would be greatly appreciated.

This model depicts the interactions of Aesop's Fable "The Boy Who Cried Wolf."

If you find these contributions meaningful your sponsorship would be greatly appreciated.
The boy is extremely [Bored Tending Sheep] and [Wants Attention].
These two factors influence the boy to [Cry Wolf] because of what he thinks will happen.
The boy believes that [Cry Wolf] will result in [Town's People Come Running] and he will become the [Center of Attention] and he will no longer be [Bored Tending Sheep].
If it were only that simple, yet there is generally more than one implication for an action.
When the boy [Cries Wolf] and there is [No Wolf] that means it's a [Lie].
[Lies] reduce the [Belief-O-Meter] and therefore reduce the likelihood that the [Town's People Come Running]. This makes it less likely that the boy will be the [Center of Attention] thus continuing the [Bored Tending Sheep] state.
But wait! There's more!
If the boy [Cries Wolf] and there is a [Wolf] then that represents [Truth] which increases the [Belief-O-Meter]. This then increases the likelihood that the [Town's People Come Running] making the boy the [Center of Attention] thus relieving the [Bored Tending Sheep] state.
What we now have is a story which should very convincingly demonstrate that the real implications of our actions may be counter-intuitive and lead to the exact opposite of what we're trying to accomplish.
Paul Aydelott has developed a version of this story from the Wolf's Perspective. Most interesting.

View the model in Insight Maker