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Olinick

English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Andrew E Long
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

Markov Chain SIR Model 3/26

Sally Dufek
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

Driehaus SIR Markov Chain

Rachel Driehaus
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

Galla Example

Andrew E Long
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

Galla age distribution model.

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Galla Example

Sally Dufek
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

Galla Age Distribution Model.

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Driehaus English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Rachel Driehaus
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

Galla example

Leah Gillespie
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Galla Example

Lizzy Compton
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Galla Example

Terra Ficke
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

Galla age distribution model.
Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Hoffmann's Galla Example

Andrew E Long
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

The Galla people have a most unusual set of age classes for their males (five of them). In this model, we look at the ages at which fathers enter, by comparison with their sons.

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Clone of English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Donna Odhiambo
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 1 week ago

Clone of English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Christopher Milesky
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

Clone of English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Allison Zembrodt
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

Clone of English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Lizzy Compton
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 8 months 3 weeks ago

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