Shellfish Models

These models and simulations have been tagged “Shellfish”.

Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.  Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.  The phytopla
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.

Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.

The phytoplankton model approximately reproduces the spring-summer diatom bloom and the (smaller) late summer dinoflagellate bloom.
 
Oyster growth is modelled only as a throughput from algae. Further developments would include filtration as a function of oyster biomass, oyster mortality, and other adjustments.
 Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, growth model      Implementation of the model developed by Kobayashi et al., (1997). The model was setted to individual growth.      Reproduction and effects of TPM on filtration rate (FR) were not included. [yellow variables]     The values of Chlorophyll, Salini
Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, growth model 

Implementation of the model developed by Kobayashi et al., (1997). The model was setted to individual growth. 

Reproduction and effects of TPM on filtration rate (FR) were not included. [yellow variables]

The values of Chlorophyll, Salinity and Water Temperature are from Mondol et al., (2016). 

The growth follows a similar trend of that reported by Modol et al., (2016) but the wet weight tissue values are 3 times higher that the expected. 

References

Kobayashi, M., Hofmann, E. E., Powell, E. N., Klinck, J. M., & Kusaka, K. (1997). A population dynamics model for the Japanese oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Aquaculture149(3-4), 285-321.

Mondol, M. R., Kim, C. W., Kang, C. K., Park, S. R., Noseworthy, R. G., & Choi, K. S. (2016). Growth and reproduction of early grow-out hardened juvenile Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas in Gamakman Bay, off the south coast of Korea. Aquaculture463, 224-233.

 Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, growth model       Implementation of the model presented by Cerco (2014), with a lot of adaptations. Model translates the individual growth.   The food source was only considered as phytoplankton, and the forcing variables temperature, DO and salinity were not
Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, growth model

Implementation of the model presented by Cerco (2014), with a lot of adaptations. Model translates the individual growth. 

The food source was only considered as phytoplankton, and the forcing variables temperature, DO and salinity were not considered.
 

Reference

Cerco, C. F. (2014). Calculation of Oyster Benefits with a Bioenergetics Model of the Virginia Oyster (No. ERDC/EL-TR-14-13). ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS ENVIRONMENTAL LAB.


Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.  Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.  The phytopla
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.

Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.

The phytoplankton model approximately reproduces the spring-summer diatom bloom and the (smaller) late summer dinoflagellate bloom.
 
Oyster growth is modelled only as a throughput from algae. Further developments would include filtration as a function of oyster biomass, oyster mortality, and other adjustments.
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.  Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.  The phytopla
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.

Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.

The phytoplankton model approximately reproduces the spring-summer diatom bloom and the (smaller) late summer dinoflagellate bloom.
 
Oyster growth is modelled only as a throughput from algae. Further developments would include filtration as a function of oyster biomass, oyster mortality, and other adjustments.
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.  Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.  The phytopla
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.

Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.

The phytoplankton model approximately reproduces the spring-summer diatom bloom and the (smaller) late summer dinoflagellate bloom.
 
Oyster growth is modelled only as a throughput from algae. Further developments would include filtration as a function of oyster biomass, oyster mortality, and other adjustments.
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.  Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.  The phytopla
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.

Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.

The phytoplankton model approximately reproduces the spring-summer diatom bloom and the (smaller) late summer dinoflagellate bloom.
 
Oyster growth is modelled only as a throughput from algae. Further developments would include filtration as a function of oyster biomass, oyster mortality, and other adjustments.
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.  Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.  The phytopla
Very simple model demonstrating growth of phytoplankton using Steele's equation for potential production and Michaelis-Menten equation for nutrient limitation.

Both light and nutrients (e.g. nitrogen) are modelled as forcing functions, and the model is "over-calibrated" for stability.

The phytoplankton model approximately reproduces the spring-summer diatom bloom and the (smaller) late summer dinoflagellate bloom.
 
Oyster growth is modelled only as a throughput from algae. Further developments would include filtration as a function of oyster biomass, oyster mortality, and other adjustments.