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Mat375

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Leah Gillespie
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Maria E Ruwe
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 2 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Matthew Gall
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of Isle Royale: Predator/Prey Model for Moose and Wolves

Patrick Nielsen
This model illustrates predator prey interactions using real-life data of wolf and moose populations on the Isle Royale. It was "cloned" from a model that InsightMaker provides to its users, at
https://insightmaker.com/insight/2068/Isle-Royale-Predator-Prey-Interactions
Thanks Scott Fortmann-Roe.

I've created a Mathematica file that replicates the model, at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/Moose-n-Wolf-InsightMaker.nb

It allows one to experiment with adjusting the initial number of moose and wolves on the island.

I used steepest descent in Mathematica to optimize the parameters, with my objective data being the ratio of wolves to moose. You can try my (admittedly) kludgy code, at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/Moose-n-Wolf-InsightMaker-BestFit.nb

{WolfBirthRateFactorStart,
WolfDeathRateStart,
MooseBirthRateStart,
MooseDeathRateFactorStart,
moStart,
woStart} =
{0.000267409,
0.239821,
0.269755,
0.0113679,
591,
23.};

Environment Ecology Populations Math Modeling Mat375

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Alyssa Farmer
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Patrick Nielsen
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 2 years 1 month ago

Clone of Clone of A Simple Infection-only SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) Example

Leah Gillespie
This is a simple example of (part of a) simple SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model, suggested by De Vries, et al. in A Course in Mathematical Biology.

They wanted to illustrate the comparative behavior of differential equations and discrete difference equations. We know that differential equations are generally solved numerically by discretizing them, so that the comparison is a little bit rigged....

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-w-discrete-version.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Lizzy Compton
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Terra Ficke
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of Cannibalistic and Chaotic Flour Beetles

Patrick Nielsen
This is an example from Cushing's book An Introduction to Structured Population Dynamics. ​

The parameters initially included reproduce the bifurcation results on p. 39 of Cushing's manuscript.
The tuning parameter is b, the birthrate.

p. 37: The LPA flour beetle model.

The bifurcation diagram for parameter b is on page 39;
The bifurcation diagram for mu adult is on p. 59;
The bifurcation diagram for C pa is on p. 60.

Andy Long

Leslie Matrices Mat375 Cushing

  • 2 years 1 month ago

Clone of Isle Royale: Predator/Prey Model for Moose and Wolves

Donna Odhiambo
This model illustrates predator prey interactions using real-life data of wolf and moose populations on the Isle Royale. It was "cloned" from a model that InsightMaker provides to its users, at
https://insightmaker.com/insight/2068/Isle-Royale-Predator-Prey-Interactions
Thanks Scott Fortmann-Roe.

I've created a Mathematica file that replicates the model, at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/Moose-n-Wolf-InsightMaker.nb

It allows one to experiment with adjusting the initial number of moose and wolves on the island.

I used steepest descent in Mathematica to optimize the parameters, with my objective data being the ratio of wolves to moose. You can try my (admittedly) kludgy code, at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/Moose-n-Wolf-InsightMaker-BestFit.nb

{WolfBirthRateFactorStart,
WolfDeathRateStart,
MooseBirthRateStart,
MooseDeathRateFactorStart,
moStart,
woStart} =
{0.000267409,
0.239821,
0.269755,
0.0113679,
591,
23.};

Environment Ecology Populations Math Modeling Mat375

  • 2 years 2 months ago

Clone of Cannibalistic and Chaotic Flour Beetles

Connor Edwards
This is an example from Cushing's book An Introduction to Structured Population Dynamics. ​

The parameters initially included reproduce the bifurcation results on p. 39 of Cushing's manuscript.
The tuning parameter is b, the birthrate.

p. 37: The LPA flour beetle model.

The bifurcation diagram for parameter b is on page 39;
The bifurcation diagram for mu adult is on p. 59;
The bifurcation diagram for C pa is on p. 60.

Andy Long

Leslie Matrices Mat375 Cushing

  • 2 years 1 month ago

Clone of A Simple Infection-only SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) Example

Adam May
This is a simple example of (part of a) simple SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model, suggested by De Vries, et al. in A Course in Mathematical Biology.

They wanted to illustrate the comparative behavior of differential equations and discrete difference equations. We know that differential equations are generally solved numerically by discretizing them, so that the comparison is a little bit rigged....

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-w-discrete-version.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Simple Infection-only SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) Example

Alyssa Farmer
This is a simple example of (part of a) simple SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model, suggested by De Vries, et al. in A Course in Mathematical Biology.

They wanted to illustrate the comparative behavior of differential equations and discrete difference equations. We know that differential equations are generally solved numerically by discretizing them, so that the comparison is a little bit rigged....

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-w-discrete-version.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Austin Hardesty
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Jacob Englert
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 2 months ago

Clone of Cannibalistic and Chaotic Flour Beetles

Patrick Nielsen
This is an example from Cushing's book An Introduction to Structured Population Dynamics. ​

The parameters initially included reproduce the bifurcation results on p. 39 of Cushing's manuscript.
The tuning parameter is b, the birthrate.

p. 37: The LPA flour beetle model.

The bifurcation diagram for parameter b is on page 39;
The bifurcation diagram for mu adult is on p. 59;
The bifurcation diagram for C pa is on p. 60.

Andy Long

Leslie Matrices Mat375 Cushing

  • 2 years 3 weeks ago

Clone of A Sleek, non-dimensionalized SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model

Clay Frink
This is an example of an SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) model that has been re-parameterized down to the bare minimum, to illustrated the dynamics possible with the fewest number of parameters.

We're rescaled this SIR model, so that time is given in infection rate-appropriate time units, "rates" are now ratios of rates (with infectivity rate in the denominator), and populations are considered proportions (unfortunately InsightMaker doesn't function properly if I give them all values from 0 to 1, which sum to 1 -- so, at the moment, I give them values that sum to 100, and consider the results percentages).

The new display includes the asymptotics: the three sub-populations will tend to fixed values as time goes to infinity; the infected population goes to zero if the recovery rate is greater than the infectivity rate -- i.e., the disease dies out.

Note the use of a "ghost" stock (for Total Population), which I think is a pretty cool idea. It cuts down on the number of arcs in the model graph.

A comparable model in Mathematica is available at
http://www.nku.edu/~longa/classes/2018spring/mat375/mathematica/SIRModel-rescaled.nb

SIR Math Modeling Mat375 Non-dimensionalize

  • 2 years 3 months ago

Clone of Cannibalistic and Chaotic Flour Beetles

Maria McMahon
This is an example from Cushing's book An Introduction to Structured Population Dynamics. ​

The parameters initially included reproduce the bifurcation results on p. 39 of Cushing's manuscript.
The tuning parameter is b, the birthrate.

p. 37: The LPA flour beetle model.

The bifurcation diagram for parameter b is on page 39;
The bifurcation diagram for mu adult is on p. 59;
The bifurcation diagram for C pa is on p. 60.

Andy Long

Leslie Matrices Mat375 Cushing

  • 2 years 1 month ago

Clone of English Mother/Daughter Birth Weights

Sally Dufek
This is an introductory example from Olinick's book An Introduction to Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences. ​

"A recent study focused on the relationship between the birth weights of English women and the birth weights of their daughters. The weights were split into three categories: low (below 6 pounds), average (between 6 and 8 pounds), and high (above 8 pounds). Among women whose own birth weights were low, 50 percent of the daughters had low birth weights, 45 percent had average weights, and 5 percent had high weights. Women with average birth weights had daughters with average weights half of the time, while the half was split evenly between low and high categories. Women with high birth weights had female babies with high weights 40 percent of the time, with low and average weights each occuring 30 percent of the time." p. 274-275.

For the Markov chain, you should make sure that you're taking time steps of length 1 in the settings, and Euler. RK-4 effectively looks beyond a single previous step, so it has a sort of memory!

Thanks Mike! Interesting examples, as always....
Andy Long

Next up: an SIR.

Markov Chain Mat375 Olinick

  • 2 years 2 months ago

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