Derby Models

These models and simulations have been tagged “Derby”.

  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
19 4 months ago
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
3 4 months ago
 Overview:   This simulation will show the relationship between tree logging forestry and how this can affect mountain biking tourism in Derby Park Tasmania. The main goal of this simulation is to show these two industries can co-exist in the same environment, or increase in demand or production in
Overview: 
This simulation will show the relationship between tree logging forestry and how this can affect mountain biking tourism in Derby Park Tasmania. The main goal of this simulation is to show these two industries can co-exist in the same environment, or increase in demand or production in one sector will affect the result of another.  

Function of the model:
In comparison there are both pros and cons for both sectors working correspondently. Demand for derby park is caused by individual past experience when visiting the park or friends recommendation which increase in the number of demands. Increase in demands will increase in the number of visitors. When visitors visits the park they require make a purchase a bike and pay the park for using the park facilities. All this will adds up to bikers total spending when visiting Derby. When consumer spend it is booting the economy especially in the tourism sector. Similarly tree logging will also contribute financially towards the Tasmania economy. The regeneration stage is relatively low compare to the logging rate. The growth will not cover the loss which can cause some level of damage in the scenery of the park, affecting tourist to view when mountain biking. Visitors overall experience will have the impact towards the demand for mountain biking in derby park, if visitors experience is satisfied they will come back to visit again or visit with group of friends, even words of mouth recommendation will also increase the level of demand of visiting Derby. 

Some key insights base on the simulation:
Based on the simulation of the two models we can see there are some key changes.
Tree logging increase will cause the disturbance of the natural scenery, thus change the overall experience of the visitors, decrease in the level of demand. Tree logging will also have negative impact towards the overall tourist experience thus affect the park facility and track. The natural scenery and the overall experience can affect their experience and if they would continue to recommend this area to friends to increase the demand. 

4 months ago
  Overview:     

 This model displays the
conflict between the tourism and timber industry in Derby, Tasmania. It becomes
a problem for the government officials when choosing the future policy direction.
Our aim is to construct a model for simulation and find a equilibrium point to
maximize the sta

Overview: 

This model displays the conflict between the tourism and timber industry in Derby, Tasmania. It becomes a problem for the government officials when choosing the future policy direction. Our aim is to construct a model for simulation and find a equilibrium point to maximize the state benefit.

 

How Does the Model Work?

The key factor of the model is the value of the policy variable. It can take values between -1 and +1. The more it is close to +1 means that the policy government takes is more tourism-friendly. The more it is close to -1 means that the policy government takes is more timber-friendly.

Other than the policy variable, there are three sections for the model.

Section 1: The tourism

       We assume that there exist a population which contains the whole potential customers. The potential customers will make bike trips to Derby at a relatively stable rate. The input policy value will affect the satisfaction rate for the tourists. Some of them will provide positive feedbacks and become our potential customers again. On the other hand, those had bad experience will no longer make trips to Derby. All the tourists make consumption every month and part of the expense will become the tourism revenue. The average expense variable is also provided in this section.

Section 2: The timber industry

      The input policy variable will also affect the employment in the timber industry. It will partially determine the industry growth rate. Like the tourism, the sales/industry scale will generate monthly revenue for the industry at a given rate.

Section 3: The state benefit

      The revenue from the two industries will be added up. Our aim is to adjust the policy value to maximize the state benefit.

 

Interesting Insights

       Excessive logging may lead to environmental problems and it isn’t the best option for the whole state benefit. Based on the pre-set parameters and the model, we can see that the revenue contribution from the tourism is also considerable. According to our results, the policy value should be around 0.31, which represents the tourism-friendly policy.

 The model simulates the comparison between mountain biking industry and forestry/logging in Derby Tasmania.     How the model works  On the left-hand side, Derby Mountain biking, tourists visit the mountain according to reviews and recommendation of mountain scenery and entertainment activities. Th
The model simulates the comparison between mountain biking industry and forestry/logging in Derby Tasmania.

How the model works
On the left-hand side, Derby Mountain biking, tourists visit the mountain according to reviews and recommendation of mountain scenery and entertainment activities. The number of people who hire bikes and who choose to dine on the mountain are limited by bike availability. Both bike hiring and biker dining contribute to tourist revenue in Derby. On the right-hand side, forest trees grow at certain rates, but are negatively affected by timber demand. Timber logging generate revenue, which depends on sale price and associated cost.

Interesting insights
Although forestry contributes more revenue in a certain time, it seems that Derby Mountain bike generate more tourist revenue from dining services and bike hiring in a long term.

4 months ago
 This model demonstrates the intertwining relationship
between the economic contribution of industrial logging and that of adventure
tourism (dominated by mountain biking).   In terms of the revenue from industrial logging at Derby, it
is driven by demand of timber and the timber price. However, the

This model demonstrates the intertwining relationship between the economic contribution of industrial logging and that of adventure tourism (dominated by mountain biking).

In terms of the revenue from industrial logging at Derby, it is driven by demand of timber and the timber price. However, the forest resources are limited, which will put constraints on the expansion of industrial logging due to regrowth rate and existing forestation.

The tourism can bring economic benefits to Derby from hospitality and selling tickets to local adventure activities. The hospitality income can be determined by the average length of holidaying at Derby and average local pricing for accommodation, food and beverages and related essentials. Tickets sales are largely affected by the similar factors such as average expense per activity and average number of activities that tourists usually choose. Having explained the streams of possible income from the tourism, the key driver for tourism income is the desire or demand to travel. Unlikely logging, tourism is renewable and perpetual. However, logging can be conceived as a major constraint on attracting as many tourists as the economy so desires.

This is because deforestation caused by logging will diminish the natural scenery at Derby and in turn, the tourist operations and attractions based upon natural scenery. Loss of forest resources is likely to make Derby less attractive to visitors.

In short, the tourism and logging both provides economic benefits to Derby but in a competing relationship. However, the sustainability possessed by tourism cannot be rivaled by industrial logging in long term. Logging revenue reveals its advantage at inception of observed time period. Such advantage wears out over the time due to reduction in resources and sluggish regrowth. Eventually. the tourism income turns into the major player. To understand how they co-exist, please simulate the model. 

4 months ago
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
4 months ago
This insight suggests a relationship between the mountain biking industry (which occurs in nature and is motivated by a desire to exercise, connect with nature and be satisfied) and the forestry industry (which relies on logging of forests to yield timber and revenue). This insight analyses this rel
This insight suggests a relationship between the mountain biking industry (which occurs in nature and is motivated by a desire to exercise, connect with nature and be satisfied) and the forestry industry (which relies on logging of forests to yield timber and revenue). This insight analyses this relationship, within the context of Derby, Tasmania. Some 38,823 Tasmania received visitor cyclists, while Tourism accounts for $2.25B of Tasmanias GSP and 33,600 jobs. 

Northern Foresty accounts for 35% of regional employment derived from Tasmania's 3.35M hectares of forests. The industry (valued at $1.2B) received $212M in 2022 in Federal support and provides over 5700 jobs and $115M to 673 Tasmanian business. This money derived from both logging and mountain biking is often reinvested in local accommodation and flows into the local economy. The two industries can coexist. Both profitable industries rely on Tasmanian trees to attract tourists and source Timber. The size of the forests impacts satisfaction and positive referrals, which in turn affect how many people go mountain biking. In order to construct new accommodation, trees must be cut to benefit the Derby population. 


4 months ago
  Overview  This model which simulates the competition of Logging with Mountain Tourism in Derby, Tasmania.  This main reason of this simulation is to find if logging will affect the mountain tourism and by any chance they can co-exist.    How the model works.   Both Timber harvesting and mountain t
Overview
This model which simulates the competition of Logging with Mountain Tourism in Derby, Tasmania.  This main reason of this simulation is to find if logging will affect the mountain tourism and by any chance they can co-exist.

How the model works.
Both Timber harvesting and mountain tourism can bring the economic contribution to Tasmania. In the Logging industry, it helps increase the need of employment and at the same time logging generate the profit through selling those timbers. In the Mountain Tourism industry, it can get the revenue through couple of ways which include accommodation (approximately 3 days find in paper), Restaurant and parking fee. However, the low growth rate of the trees is not keeping up with the rate of logging, if the trees getting less in Derby mountain, it will affect the sights and the riding experience for tourists, which will affect the satisfaction and expectation as it depends on the sights and experience. The satisfaction and expectation will influence the number of visitors, if they satisfied, they can come again or tell others about the great experience, if not, more and more people will not come again.

Interesting insights
It seems like logging has no significant negative effect to the mountain tourism, compare the forestry income with the tourism income, tourism income gradually higher than the forestry income at last, which means tourism is in a very important position, as long as the visitors are stable, tourism industry can provide greater economic contribution, stakeholders and governments can find the balance by maintain the status or better slightly reduce logging in order to make them co-exist.
4 months ago
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
4 months ago
Overview This model is a working simulation of the competition between the mountain biking tourism industry versus the forestry logging within Derby Tasmania.    How the model works  The left side of the model highlights the mountain bike flow beginning with demand for the forest that leads to incre
Overview
This model is a working simulation of the competition between the mountain biking tourism industry versus the forestry logging within Derby Tasmania.

How the model works
The left side of the model highlights the mountain bike flow beginning with demand for the forest that leads to increased visitors using the forest of mountain biking. Accompanying variables effect the tourism income that flows from use of the bike trails.
On the right side, the forest flow begins with tree growth then a demand for timber leading to the logging production. The sales from the logging then lead to the forestry income.
The model works by identifying how the different variables interact with both mountain biking and logging. As illustrated there are variables that have a shared effect such as scenery and adventure and entertainment.

Variables
The variables are essential in understanding what drives the flow within the model. For example mountain biking demand is dependent on positive word mouth which in turn is dependent on scenery. This is an important factor as logging has a negative impact on how the scenery changes as logging deteriorates the landscape and therefore effects positive word of mouth.
By establishing variables and their relationships with each other, the model highlights exactly how mountain biking and forestry logging effect each other and the income it supports.

Interesting Insights
The model suggests that though there is some impact from logging, tourism still prospers in spite of negative impacts to the scenery with tourism increasing substantially over forestry income. There is also a point at which the visitor population increases exponentially at which most other variables including adventure and entertainment also increase in result. The model suggests that it may be possible for logging and mountain biking to happen simultaneously without negatively impacting on the tourism income.
4 months ago
 Overview 

 A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure
tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  

  
How the model works: 

 Trees grow, and we cut them down because of the demand for Timber and
sell the logs. Mountain bikers and holiday visitors will come t

Overview

A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania. 


How the model works:

Trees grow, and we cut them down because of the demand for Timber and sell the logs. Mountain bikers and holiday visitors will come to the park and this depends on experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depend on the Scenery, number of trees compared to the visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  To utilize highest park capacity, they need to promote to the holiday visitor segment as well. Again, the visit depends on the scenery. So, both mountain biking and forestry (logging) businesses need to contribute a significant amount of revenue to CSR for faster regrowth of trees.


Interesting insights

It looks like a lot of logging doesn't stop people from mountain biking. 

Faster replantation of the tree will balance out the impact created by logging which will give the visitor a positive experience and the number of visitors is both improved. 

To keep the park's popularity in check, the price of wood needs to be high. 

Also, it looks like mountain biking only needs a narrow path.

CSR contribution to nature can be a crucial factor. 

  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
4 months ago
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
Overview This model is a working simulation of the competition between the mountain biking tourism industry versus the forestry logging within Derby Tasmania.    How the model works  The left side of the model highlights the mountain bike flow beginning with demand for the forest that leads to incre
Overview
This model is a working simulation of the competition between the mountain biking tourism industry versus the forestry logging within Derby Tasmania.

How the model works
The left side of the model highlights the mountain bike flow beginning with demand for the forest that leads to increased visitors using the forest of mountain biking. Accompanying variables effect the tourism income that flows from use of the bike trails.
On the right side, the forest flow begins with tree growth then a demand for timber leading to the logging production. The sales from the logging then lead to the forestry income.
The model works by identifying how the different variables interact with both mountain biking and logging. As illustrated there are variables that have a shared effect such as scenery and adventure and entertainment.

Variables
The variables are essential in understanding what drives the flow within the model. For example mountain biking demand is dependent on positive word mouth which in turn is dependent on scenery. This is an important factor as logging has a negative impact on how the scenery changes as logging deteriorates the landscape and therefore effects positive word of mouth.
By establishing variables and their relationships with each other, the model highlights exactly how mountain biking and forestry logging effect each other and the income it supports.

Interesting Insights
The model suggests that though there is some impact from logging, tourism still prospers in spite of negative impacts to the scenery with tourism increasing substantially over forestry income. There is also a point at which the visitor population increases exponentially at which most other variables including adventure and entertainment also increase in result. The model suggests that it may be possible for logging and mountain biking to happen simultaneously without negatively impacting on the tourism income.
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
4 months ago
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking
4 months ago
  Overview  A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.     How the model works.   Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.  Wit
Overview
A model which simulates the competition between logging versus adventure tourism (mountain bike ridding) in Derby Tasmania.  Simulation borrowed from the Easter Island simulation.

How the model works.
Trees grow, we cut them down because of demand for Timber amd sell the logs.
With mountain bkie visits.  This depends on past experience and recommendations.  Past experience and recommendations depends on Scenery number of trees compared to visitor and Adventure number of trees and users.  Park capacity limits the number of users.  
Interesting insights
It seems that high logging does not deter mountain biking.  By reducing park capacity, visitor experience and numbers are improved.  A major problem is that any success with the mountain bike park leads to an explosion in visitor numbers.  Also a high price of timber is needed to balance popularity of the park. It seems also that only a narrow corridor is needed for mountain biking