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Population

Clone of FORCED GROWTH INTO TURBULENCE

Te Kou Gage
FORCED GROWTH GROWTH GOES INTO TURBULENT CHAOTIC DESTRUCTION 
 BEWARE pushing increased growth blows the system!
(governments are trying to push growth on already unstable systems !)

The existing global capitalistic growth paradigm is totally flawed

The chaotic turbulence is the result of the concept and flawed strategy of infinite bigness this has been the destructive influence on all empires and now shown up by Feigenbaum numbers and Dunbar numbers for neural netwoirks

See Guy Lakeman Bubble Theory for more details on keeping systems within finite limited size working capacity containers (villages communities)

Environment Economics Finance Mathematics Physics Biology Health Fractals Chaos TURBULENCE Engineering Navier Stokes Science Demographics Population Growth BIFURCATIONS MTBF Strategy Weather

  • 7 years 7 months ago

Clone of Clone of Clone of BATHTUB MEAN TIME BETWEEN FAILURE (MTBF) RISK

Alena Peskova
Simulation of MTBF with controls

F(t) = 1 - e ^ -λt Where  • F(t) is the probability of failure  • λ is the failure rate in 1/time unit (1/h, for example) • t is the observed service life (h, for example)
The inverse curve is the trust time
On the right the increase in failures brings its inverse which is loss of trust and move into suspicion and lack of confidence.
This can be seen in strategic social applications with those who put economy before providing the priorities of the basic living infrastructures for all.

This applies to policies and strategic decisions as well as physical equipment.
A) Equipment wears out through friction and preventive maintenance can increase the useful lifetime, 
B) Policies/working practices/guidelines have to be updated to reflect changes in the external environment and eventually be replaced when for instance a population rises too large (constitutional changes are required to keep pace with evolution, e.g. the concepts of the ancient Greeks, 3000 years ago, who based their thoughts on a small population cannot be applied in 2013 except where populations can be contained into productive working communities with balanced profit and loss centers to ensure sustainability)

Early LifeIf we follow the slope from the leftmost start to where it begins to flatten out this can be considered the first period. The first period is characterized by a decreasing failure rate. It is what occurs during the “early life” of a population of units. The weaker units fail leaving a population that is more rigorous.
Useful Life
The next period is the flat bottom portion of the graph. It is called the “useful life” period. Failures occur more in a random sequence during this time. It is difficult to predict which failure mode will occur, but the rate of failures is predictable. Notice the constant slope.  
Wearout
The third period begins at the point where the slope begins to increase and extends to the rightmost end of the graph. This is what happens when units become old and begin to fail at an increasing rate. It is called the “wearout” period. 

Environment Economics Finance Mathematics Physics Biology Health Fractals Chaos TURBULENCE Engineering Navier Stokes Science Demographics Population Growth BIFURCATIONS MTBF Risk Failure Strategy

  • 5 years 7 months ago

Clone of BATHTUB MEAN TIME BETWEEN FAILURE (MTBF) RISK

Te Kou Gage
Simulation of MTBF with controls

F(t) = 1 - e ^ -λt Where  • F(t) is the probability of failure  • λ is the failure rate in 1/time unit (1/h, for example) • t is the observed service life (h, for example)
The inverse curve is the trust time
On the right the increase in failures brings its inverse which is loss of trust and move into suspicion and lack of confidence.
This can be seen in strategic social applications with those who put economy before providing the priorities of the basic living infrastructures for all.

This applies to policies and strategic decisions as well as physical equipment.
A) Equipment wears out through friction and preventive maintenance can increase the useful lifetime, 
B) Policies/working practices/guidelines have to be updated to reflect changes in the external environment and eventually be replaced when for instance a population rises too large (constitutional changes are required to keep pace with evolution, e.g. the concepts of the ancient Greeks, 3000 years ago, who based their thoughts on a small population cannot be applied in 2013 except where populations can be contained into productive working communities with balanced profit and loss centers to ensure sustainability)

Early LifeIf we follow the slope from the leftmost start to where it begins to flatten out this can be considered the first period. The first period is characterized by a decreasing failure rate. It is what occurs during the “early life” of a population of units. The weaker units fail leaving a population that is more rigorous.
Useful Life
The next period is the flat bottom portion of the graph. It is called the “useful life” period. Failures occur more in a random sequence during this time. It is difficult to predict which failure mode will occur, but the rate of failures is predictable. Notice the constant slope.  
Wearout
The third period begins at the point where the slope begins to increase and extends to the rightmost end of the graph. This is what happens when units become old and begin to fail at an increasing rate. It is called the “wearout” period. 

Environment Economics Finance Mathematics Physics Biology Health Fractals Chaos TURBULENCE Engineering Navier Stokes Science Demographics Population Growth BIFURCATIONS MTBF Risk Failure Strategy

  • 7 years 7 months ago

Demographic Transition-Brazil

Danielle mccarthy
Show relation of birth and death rate over time, creating the elements of the demographic transition. This one is for Bangladesh. You can clone this insight for other nations, just plug in the new crude birth and death rates and find the starting population in 1960.

Birth.Death Population

  • 2 years 2 months ago

HW4 P2 Zeyuan Guo

Zeyuan Guo
This is part 3 of the Feb 10-17 exercise for Human Population. The Nature model (ecological footprint versus biocapacity) plus the People model (exponential growth with affluence dependent birth and death rates) are connected using the I=PAT model (impact on Nature depends on affluence). Explore the variables (yellow) by monitoring the outputs (red).

Population

  • 3 years 9 months ago

Population of Haiti (Undeveloped) Over Time

Christopher Hartline
Here we model the population of Haiti, a relativly underdeveloped country, given data between 1960 and 2013 from Worldbank.org. We used the crude birth rate and crude death rate for every 5 years since 1960 to 2005, and the rates every year from 2005 to 2013. To forecast, we used the slope of the net birth rate to calculate when the net birth rate would be zero, and used this year for our birth and death rates to are equal to zero. We assumed no net movement of people into or out of Haiti.

Population Growth

  • 4 years 11 months ago

Clone of Clone of Clone of Clone of BATHTUB MEAN TIME BETWEEN FAILURE (MTBF) RISK

Alena Peskova
Simulation of MTBF with controls

F(t) = 1 - e ^ -λt Where  • F(t) is the probability of failure  • λ is the failure rate in 1/time unit (1/h, for example) • t is the observed service life (h, for example)
The inverse curve is the trust time
On the right the increase in failures brings its inverse which is loss of trust and move into suspicion and lack of confidence.
This can be seen in strategic social applications with those who put economy before providing the priorities of the basic living infrastructures for all.

This applies to policies and strategic decisions as well as physical equipment.
A) Equipment wears out through friction and preventive maintenance can increase the useful lifetime, 
B) Policies/working practices/guidelines have to be updated to reflect changes in the external environment and eventually be replaced when for instance a population rises too large (constitutional changes are required to keep pace with evolution, e.g. the concepts of the ancient Greeks, 3000 years ago, who based their thoughts on a small population cannot be applied in 2013 except where populations can be contained into productive working communities with balanced profit and loss centers to ensure sustainability)

Early LifeIf we follow the slope from the leftmost start to where it begins to flatten out this can be considered the first period. The first period is characterized by a decreasing failure rate. It is what occurs during the “early life” of a population of units. The weaker units fail leaving a population that is more rigorous.
Useful Life
The next period is the flat bottom portion of the graph. It is called the “useful life” period. Failures occur more in a random sequence during this time. It is difficult to predict which failure mode will occur, but the rate of failures is predictable. Notice the constant slope.  
Wearout
The third period begins at the point where the slope begins to increase and extends to the rightmost end of the graph. This is what happens when units become old and begin to fail at an increasing rate. It is called the “wearout” period. 

Environment Economics Finance Mathematics Physics Biology Health Fractals Chaos TURBULENCE Engineering Navier Stokes Science Demographics Population Growth BIFURCATIONS MTBF Risk Failure Strategy

  • 4 years 10 months ago

Chemostat

Maximilian Maier
Simulation of a chemostat bioreactor.

X = microbiological mass
S = substrate concentration
D = dilution rate
Y = yield of microbiological massfrom a unit of substrate
mu = maximum growth rate
Ks = Michaelis-Menten-constant

BPI Chemostat Population

  • 2 years 8 months ago

Population Growth and Sustainability

Gregory Michael Joern
Population growth and increased resource usage per person (in terms of energy, land use, dwellings, public services, use of products, food products, etc.) are at the core of the rapid changes in the Earth's surface layers (land use, soil, hydrosphere, atmosphere), which are unsustainable. To what extent is the way population growths and increased resource usage is sanctioned consistent with the ethical principles our society is based on and what changes in systems that provide sanctions for population growth and resource usage would increase the consistency between the normative and descriptive ethics in our society? The case study will consider what population growth and increase in resource usage is expected for the Chesapeake Bay area and identify the potential hazards this growth might create for the Bay. The study will discuss the fragilities of the human and non-human environment to growth-related hazards, and will develop foresight in terms of possible futures. The study will consider to what extent these futures would be consistent with the current ethics and develop interventions that would reduce any discrepancy between the descriptive and normative ethics.

Environment Population Sustainability

  • 1 month 4 weeks ago

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