Funding Models

These models and simulations have been tagged “Funding”.

Related tagsHealth Care

 The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

A restatement of the ISDC Nijmegen 2006  paper   Exploring the Political and Economic Dimensions of Health Policy  This may benefit from simplification and using cultural theory. See  IM-57161  for extension
A restatement of the ISDC Nijmegen 2006 paper Exploring the Political and Economic Dimensions of Health Policy This may benefit from simplification and using cultural theory. See IM-57161 for extension
From PLOS One  Article  April 2012 Worni, M et al System Dynamics to Model the Unintended Consequences of Denying Payment for Venous Thromboembolism after Total Knee Arthroplasty
From PLOS One Article April 2012 Worni, M et al System Dynamics to Model the Unintended Consequences of Denying Payment for Venous Thromboembolism after Total Knee Arthroplasty
 The effects of subsidies and incentives for private health insurance on the mix of public and private hospital use. The central role of adverse selection/moral hazard on private health insurance sustainability. See also  updated version  around 2017

The effects of subsidies and incentives for private health insurance on the mix of public and private hospital use. The central role of adverse selection/moral hazard on private health insurance sustainability. See also updated version around 2017

 Downstream and upstream responses, from Jack Homer , Gary HIrsch and Bobby Milstein. Chronic Illness in a Complex Health Economy  Syst. Dyn. Rev. 23, 313-343 (2007). Conference paper available at   http://bit.ly/JCO68V

Downstream and upstream responses, from Jack Homer , Gary HIrsch and Bobby Milstein. Chronic Illness in a Complex Health Economy  Syst. Dyn. Rev. 23, 313-343 (2007). Conference paper available at  http://bit.ly/JCO68V

 Australian Health Care Funding Flows, adapted from the National Hospitals and Health Reform Commission Report. Expanded in  IM-78418

Australian Health Care Funding Flows, adapted from the National Hospitals and Health Reform Commission Report. Expanded in IM-78418

Expansion of  IM-24317  for adding other funding insights Im-633 and 636 . See also  IM-57110  contrasting economic drivers of mental health with other health care based on JHPPL David Mechanic 2016 issue articles, esp Glied
Expansion of IM-24317 for adding other funding insights Im-633 and 636 . See also IM-57110 contrasting economic drivers of mental health with other health care based on JHPPL David Mechanic 2016 issue articles, esp Glied
Clone of  IM-24317  for adding other funding insights Im-633 and 636 and contrasting economic drivers of mental health with other health care based on  JHPPL David Mechanic 2016 issue  articles, esp  Glied article  (paywalled) Backed up generic version at  IM-59166
Clone of IM-24317 for adding other funding insights Im-633 and 636 and contrasting economic drivers of mental health with other health care based on JHPPL David Mechanic 2016 issue articles, esp Glied article (paywalled) Backed up generic version at IM-59166
 Update to the original  IM-636  from around 2002 based on 2017 discussion/inquiry into improving private health insurance in Australia 

Update to the original IM-636 from around 2002 based on 2017 discussion/inquiry into improving private health insurance in Australia 

This insight illustrates the relationship between the funding of policing and community development initiatives, to reduce crime rates in Bourke, NSW. The insight categorises community members into four groups:     'At risk community members' are individuals who have been identified as likely to com
This insight illustrates the relationship between the funding of policing and community development initiatives, to reduce crime rates in Bourke, NSW.
The insight categorises community members into four groups:

'At risk community members' are individuals who have been identified as likely to commit crime.

'Charged' community members are individuals who have committed a crime, have been caught and charged.

'Community development program members' are individuals who have been identified as at risk, but have also been selected to take part in a community development progam.

'Community members' are individuals who are not classified as at risk. 

This insight shows the process of how individuals transfer between categories, with finance as the independent variable. Finance can be altered from a minimum of $250,000 to a maximum of $1,000,000. The finance variable can be altered using the total finance slider located on the right hand side.

Assumptions
Here is a list of assumptions made about this scenario. Assumptions are also found in the story of this insight.

*Bourke comprises of 3000 individuals. 2750 are classified as at risk and 250 as community members at time 0

*The average jail sentence is two years

*The government pays $1,000 per year for each individual who is charged and jailed

*The average cost of a community development program is $4,000 per year, per individual

*The average individual will relapse and commit a crime or be rehabilitated within three years
Clone of  IM 57110  as backup Which is a Clone of  IM-24317  for adding other funding insights Im-633 and 636 and contrasting economic drivers of mental health with other health care based on  JHPPL David Mechanic 2016 issue  articles, esp  Glied article  (paywalled)
Clone of IM 57110 as backup Which is a Clone of IM-24317 for adding other funding insights Im-633 and 636 and contrasting economic drivers of mental health with other health care based on JHPPL David Mechanic 2016 issue articles, esp Glied article (paywalled)
Showing how multiple effect loops for private patients in public hospitals can be represented as a causal loop diagram (CLD)
Showing how multiple effect loops for private patients in public hospitals can be represented as a causal loop diagram (CLD)
 Expanded version of  IM-639  based on Health Expenditure Australia 2014-5 Table A3. See also  IM-93836  for additional 2015-6 Table A3 added

Expanded version of IM-639 based on Health Expenditure Australia 2014-5 Table A3. See also IM-93836 for additional 2015-6 Table A3 added

This simple high level model shows the basic feedback balancing loop for health services. There are many other loops and component interactions at multiple scales that add to the complexity See areas of  expenditure IM  for some component splits and  hospital value IM  for some service linkages
This simple high level model shows the basic feedback balancing loop for health services. There are many other loops and component interactions at multiple scales that add to the complexity See areas of expenditure IM for some component splits and hospital value IM for some service linkages
 Clone of  IM-93836  with Health Expenditure australia 2016-7 Table A3 added with change

Clone of IM-93836 with Health Expenditure australia 2016-7 Table A3 added with change

 Clone of   IM Health Expenditure australia 2015-6  (Table A3 with past year change) with 2015-6 detail added from NH Funding pool annual report  website . Also current and emerging IHPA pricing classifications See also combined  performance and activity stock flow IM  IHPA and NHPA

Clone of  IM Health Expenditure australia 2015-6 (Table A3 with past year change) with 2015-6 detail added from NH Funding pool annual report website. Also current and emerging IHPA pricing classifications See also combined performance and activity stock flow IM IHPA and NHPA

 The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

 The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

A restatement of the ISDC Nijmegen 2006  paper   Exploring the Political and Economic Dimensions of Health Policy  This may benefit from simplification and using cultural theory
A restatement of the ISDC Nijmegen 2006 paper Exploring the Political and Economic Dimensions of Health Policy This may benefit from simplification and using cultural theory
 The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

The dynamics of health care spending, or why it keeps growing. Adapted from Fig 7.6 p154 of Sauwakon Ratanawijitrasin's PhD thesis SUNY Albany 1993 "The dynamics of health care finance: A feedback view of system behavior."

 Clone of  IM-78418  with Health Expenditure australia 2015-6 Table A3 added with change. See  IM-146291  for 2016-7

Clone of IM-78418 with Health Expenditure australia 2015-6 Table A3 added with change. See IM-146291 for 2016-7