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Sustainability

Clone of Levels of transition needed to sustainability

Dennis
Challenges in sustainability are multilevel.
This diagram attempts to summarize levels of self reinforcing destructive dynamics, authors that deal with them, and point of leverage for change.

The base of the crisis is a mechanistic rather than ecological worldview. This mechanistic worldview is based on outdated science that assumed the universe to be a large machine. In a machine there is an inside and an outside. The health of the inside is important for the machine, the outside not. In an ecological view everything is interconnected, there is no clear separation in the future of self and other. All parts influence the health of other parts. To retain health sensitivity and democracy are inherent. The sense of separation from other that keeps the mechanistic worldview dominant is duality. Being cut off from spiritual traditions due to a mechanistic view of science people need access to inter-spirituality to reconnect with the human traditions and tools around connectedness, inner discovery, and compassion. Many books on modern physics and biology deal with the system view implications. "The coming interspiritual age" deals with the need to connect spiritual traditions and science.

At the bottom for the dynamic is an individual a sense of disconnectedness leads to a dependency on spending and having rather than connecting. The connecting has become too painful and dealing with it unpopular in our culture. Joanna Macy deals with this in Active Hope. 

This affluenza and disconnection is worsened by a market that floods one with advertisements aimed at creating needs and a sense of dissatisfaction with that one has.

National economies are structured around maximising GDP which means maximising consumption and financial capital movement. This is at the cost of local economies. These same local economies are needed for balanced happiness as well as for sustainability.

Generally institutions focus on maximising consumption rather than sustaining life support systems. David Korten covers this well.

Power and wealth is confused in this worldview. In striving for wealth only power is striven for in the form of money and monopoly.

Those at the head of large banks and corporations tend to be there because they exemplify this approach. They have few scruples about enforcing this approach onto everyone through wars and disaster capitalism. Naomi Klein and David Estulin documented this.

Power has become so centralized that we need this understanding to be widespread and include many of those in power. Progress of all of these levels are needed to show them and all that another way is possible.

Environment Power Capitalism Exploitation Affluenza Sustainability Crisis Ecology Transition The Great Turning

  • 7 years 1 day ago

Clone of Assingment 2

Yas Khader

Rainfall is posing a dangerous threat to high-precipitation cities such as Vancouver. In natural, forested conditions, 10-20 mm of the rainfall that occurs is intercepted by the lush, vegetative canopy of trees and plants, as it is eventually soaked into the ground before stormwater runoff is generated. This contrasts heavily with unnatural, urbanized areas, where runoff can be generated from as little as 2 mm of precipitation! In an average month in Vancouver, 240 mm of precipitation may fall in 30 days. This equates to an average of 8 mm of precipitation a day. As our climate continues to warm, the frequency and the intensity of our rainfall will only increase. By the year 2050, Vancouver is expected to experience a 5% increase in the volume of rain that occurs over the winter months, alternatively experiencing a 19% decrease in the amount of rainfall throughout the summer months. On Vancouver’s wettest days, extreme rainfall events are expected to intensify by 63%. Our snowpack  is expected to decrease by 53%, as our city’s snow will melt due to the increased temperatures. This will result in surface water flooding, sewer backups, and sewage overflow. Currently, Vancouver’s only approach to solving this issue is spending money to fix and replace the damages that are generated from this unmitigated stormwater runoff. The city of Vancouver has allocated $29.5 million towards Sewer Main replacement. The amount of runoff that is generated from our urbanized city is not only harming the environment, but the economy as well. What could possibly be a better solution than spending money to fix all of these damages runoff is creating? Green Infrastructure! By implementing green infrastructure, this issue is combated in a holistic manner. Through thoughtfully designed living roofs, swales, rain gardens, permeable paving, and rain barrels, we are able to mitigate this stormwater runoff in an effective way that supports our environment, economy, and our society.


As you can see through our model, implementing Green Infrastructure offers a solution to the issue of unmitigated storm water in Vancouver. This Green Infrastructure is engineered by landscape architects and hydrological engineers, and is able to adapt to a system specific to our regional conditions to ensure that the water runoff mimics the natural landscape of the land before our urban infrastructure ruined it. In our model under “Economic Trends,” there is an initial delay and drop in property value, which is due to a period of trial and error during the installation of Green Infrastructure. Investment in Green Infrastructure will increase, leading to the rise of property values. Moreover, in the “Environmental” section of our model, we initially see a decrease in our volume of unpolluted, drinkable groundwater. This occurs during the transition phase as Green Infrastructure is becoming implemented into our buildings and landscapes. Eventually, the amount of drinkable groundwater stabilizes and balances off. Furthermore, in our model under “Trends for Green Homes effect on UHI and Snowmelt/Snowpacks,” it is evident that as more homes are built with Green Infrastructure, the Urban Heated Island effect decreases, as the airflow is better regulated, leading to a cooler average temperature throughout the area. This allows for maintenance of our mountainous snowpacks, and thus decreasing the amount of runoff that is generated from snowmelt. Finally, our society is impacted by this solution of Green Infrastructure, as our population will be happy with the ample amount of accessible, clean drinking water that this solution provides them. Morale will increase as homes are no longer at risk of water damage due to flash floods, and environmental awareness will rise, along with motivation and drive towards creating a more sustainable and holistic lifestyle.

Systems Sustainability

  • 3 years 2 months ago

Population Growth and Sustainability

Gregory Michael Joern
Population growth and increased resource usage per person (in terms of energy, land use, dwellings, public services, use of products, food products, etc.) are at the core of the rapid changes in the Earth's surface layers (land use, soil, hydrosphere, atmosphere), which are unsustainable. To what extent is the way population growths and increased resource usage is sanctioned consistent with the ethical principles our society is based on and what changes in systems that provide sanctions for population growth and resource usage would increase the consistency between the normative and descriptive ethics in our society? The case study will consider what population growth and increase in resource usage is expected for the Chesapeake Bay area and identify the potential hazards this growth might create for the Bay. The study will discuss the fragilities of the human and non-human environment to growth-related hazards, and will develop foresight in terms of possible futures. The study will consider to what extent these futures would be consistent with the current ethics and develop interventions that would reduce any discrepancy between the descriptive and normative ethics.

Environment Population Sustainability

  • 7 months 4 days ago

Clone of ISCI 360 Project Stage 2

Austin Wallace

Primitive Legend:

Grocery Store Inventory is a stock that represents the amount of perishable food units available for sale to consumers. This stock is directly affected by the forces of economics as grocers can only sell at the level that their produce is demanded. As a result, once this stock exceeds demand, it will rise as food no longer sold.

Overstock Waste is a stock that is designed to model the overstock display assumption which states that consumers have more incentive to purchase foods from fully stocked piles rather than empty ones. This stock exists and accumulates over time because grocers purchase excess produce to give buyers incentive.

Ugly Food Stock is the stock that represent the amount of perfectly nutritious ugly produce neglected by consumers as they only buy the prettiest clusters from the display. This stock includes foods such as brown bananas, dented apples, and so forth. These ugly foods are left behind in addition to the overstock waste.

Education Programs is the stock that contains the amount of ugly foods delivered to local school districts for educating students on the significance of ugly food discrimination. These foods are utilized in various forms of comparative demonstrations to illustrate to students that ugly foods are just as nutritious as prettier alternatives.

Compost Alternatives is the stock that depicts the efforts of grocery stores trying to implement a method that allows them to reduce the amount of waste they send to the landfill. These compost methods may be in the form on enriched manure given back to the farmers that supply the produce.

10 Food Units/Resale Output is the variable that illustrates the amount of food units required to make a product for resale. For example, it takes 10 units of melons to make an assorted melon platter. Likewise, a single smoothie for resale will require 5 units of assorted fruits.

Sustainability

  • 3 years 2 months ago

Clone of Levels of transition needed to sustainability

MaxMuster
Challenges in sustainability are multilevel.
This diagram attempts to summarize levels of self reinforcing destructive dynamics, authors that deal with them, and point of leverage for change.

The base of the crisis is a mechanistic rather than ecological worldview. This mechanistic worldview is based on outdated science that assumed the universe to be a large machine. In a machine there is an inside and an outside. The health of the inside is important for the machine, the outside not. In an ecological view everything is interconnected, there is no clear separation in the future of self and other. All parts influence the health of other parts. To retain health sensitivity and democracy are inherent. The sense of separation from other that keeps the mechanistic worldview dominant is duality. Being cut off from spiritual traditions due to a mechanistic view of science people need access to inter-spirituality to reconnect with the human traditions and tools around connectedness, inner discovery, and compassion. Many books on modern physics and biology deal with the system view implications. "The coming interspiritual age" deals with the need to connect spiritual traditions and science.

At the bottom for the dynamic is an individual a sense of disconnectedness leads to a dependency on spending and having rather than connecting. The connecting has become too painful and dealing with it unpopular in our culture. Joanna Macy deals with this in Active Hope. 

This affluenza and disconnection is worsened by a market that floods one with advertisements aimed at creating needs and a sense of dissatisfaction with that one has.

National economies are structured around maximising GDP which means maximising consumption and financial capital movement. This is at the cost of local economies. These same local economies are needed for balanced happiness as well as for sustainability.

Generally institutions focus on maximising consumption rather than sustaining life support systems. David Korten covers this well.

Power and wealth is confused in this worldview. In striving for wealth only power is striven for in the form of money and monopoly.

Those at the head of large banks and corporations tend to be there because they exemplify this approach. They have few scruples about enforcing this approach onto everyone through wars and disaster capitalism. Naomi Klein and David Estulin documented this.

Power has become so centralized that we need this understanding to be widespread and include many of those in power. Progress of all of these levels are needed to show them and all that another way is possible.

Environment Power Capitalism Exploitation Affluenza Sustainability Crisis Ecology Transition The Great Turning

  • 7 years 2 months ago

Clone of Clone of Levels of transition needed to sustainability

Charles Anosike
Challenges in sustainability are multilevel.
This diagram attempts to summarize levels of self reinforcing destructive dynamics, authors that deal with them, and point of leverage for change.

The base of the crisis is a mechanistic rather than ecological worldview. This mechanistic worldview is based on outdated science that assumed the universe to be a large machine. In a machine there is an inside and an outside. The health of the inside is important for the machine, the outside not. In an ecological view everything is interconnected, there is no clear separation in the future of self and other. All parts influence the health of other parts. To retain health sensitivity and democracy are inherent. The sense of separation from other that keeps the mechanistic worldview dominant is duality. Being cut off from spiritual traditions due to a mechanistic view of science people need access to inter-spirituality to reconnect with the human traditions and tools around connectedness, inner discovery, and compassion. Many books on modern physics and biology deal with the system view implications. "The coming interspiritual age" deals with the need to connect spiritual traditions and science.

At the bottom for the dynamic is an individual a sense of disconnectedness leads to a dependency on spending and having rather than connecting. The connecting has become too painful and dealing with it unpopular in our culture. Joanna Macy deals with this in Active Hope. 

This affluenza and disconnection is worsened by a market that floods one with advertisements aimed at creating needs and a sense of dissatisfaction with that one has.

National economies are structured around maximising GDP which means maximising consumption and financial capital movement. This is at the cost of local economies. These same local economies are needed for balanced happiness as well as for sustainability.

Generally institutions focus on maximising consumption rather than sustaining life support systems. David Korten covers this well.

Power and wealth is confused in this worldview. In striving for wealth only power is striven for in the form of money and monopoly.

Those at the head of large banks and corporations tend to be there because they exemplify this approach. They have few scruples about enforcing this approach onto everyone through wars and disaster capitalism. Naomi Klein and David Estulin documented this.

Power has become so centralized that we need this understanding to be widespread and include many of those in power. Progress of all of these levels are needed to show them and all that another way is possible.

Environment Power Capitalism Exploitation Affluenza Sustainability Crisis Ecology Transition The Great Turning

  • 7 years 7 months ago

Fixed Quota versus Fixed Effort

Sabrina Fisher
This model incorporates several options in examining fisheries dynamics and fisheries employment. The two most important aspects are the choice between I)managing based on setting fixed quota versus setting fixed effort , and ii) using the 'scientific advice' for quota setting  versus allowing 'political influence' on quota setting (the assumption here is that you have good estimates of recruitment and stock assessments that form the basis of 'scientific advice' and then 'political influnce' that desires increased quota beyond the scientific advice).

Fishery Management Population Sustainability

  • 1 year 2 months ago

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