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Ecology

Caribou Conservation Triage-V2

Rob Rempel
Woodland caribou is a species at risk because of northward expansion of resource development activity.  Some herds are in dire condition and well below self-sustainability, while others are only moderately below self-sustaining levels.  Given limited conservation dollars, what are the most effective conservation actions, and how much money needs to be spent?  Which herds should be a priority for conservation efforts? The purpose of this model to provide insight into these difficult conservation questions.  
This model was developed by Rob Rempel and Jen Shuter at the Centre for Northern Forest Ecosystem Research, and was based in part on input from attendees of a modelling workshop ("Modelling the Caribou Questions") held at the 16th North American Caribou Workshop in Thunder Bay, Ontario, May 2016.

Population Caribou Wolves Moose Conservation Triage Ecology

  • 1 year 9 months ago

Vegetation interspecific competition

Andrew Hofmeister
Common Timothy is an invasive grass species.  Alpine Timothy is the native grass species in Yellowstone.  I calculated the carrying capacity of the grasses by converting acres, square feet, pounds per square feet and seeds per pound.  There is a higher birth rate and lower death rate for the common timothy because the grass is taking over the area due to a lack of wildlife predators.

Ecology

  • 5 years 7 months ago

Final Midterm Student version of A More Realistic Model of Isle Royale: Predator Prey Interactions

Andrew E Long
This model illustrates predator prey interactions using real-life data of wolf and moose populations on the Isle Royale.

We incorporate logistic growth into the moose dynamics, and we replace the death flow of the moose with a kill rate modeled from the kill rate data found on the Isle Royale website.

I start with these parameters:
Wolf Death Rate = 0.15
Wolf Birth Rate = 0.0187963
Moose Birth Rate = 0.4
Carrying Capacity = 2000
Initial Moose: 563
Initial Wolves: 20

I used RK-4 with step-size 0.1, from 1959 for 60 years.

The moose birth flow is logistic, MBR*M*(1-M/K)
Moose death flow is Kill Rate (in Moose/Year)
Wolf birth flow is WBR*Kill Rate (in Wolves/Year)
Wolf death flow is WDR*W

Environment Ecology Populations Midterm

  • 3 years 3 months ago

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